WMU’s Heritage Hall Achieves LEED Platinum Certification

Western Michigan University’s faculty, staff and students gathered with LEED project crew members yesterday at Heritage Hall for a ribbon cutting ceremony and ice cream social to accept their LEED Platinum plaque.

Western Michigan University completed a historical rebuild of the beautiful Heritage Hall building, home of the Alumni Center on Prospect Hill.  Not only did they renovate a 110 year old building, they renovated it all while designing for LEED Platinum certification.

LEED Platinum is the highest status a project can achieve in the Leadership in Environment and Energy Design rating system.

Western recipients mounted their LEED Platinum plaque previous to the ceremony. A certificate for their LEED achievement was presented.

Pictured from left to right: Pete Strazdas – AVP Facilities Management (WMU), Bjorn Green – President & CEO (TowerPinkster), Cheri Holman – Executive Director (USGBC WM), John M. Dunn – President (WMU), Renee Pearl – Director of Engagement (WMU), and Jason Novotny – Director of Design (TowerPinkster).

The original construction of Heritage Hall was completed in 1905 at 34,000 square feet. The facility was renovated and made its official debut as Heritage Hall in October of 2015. The building nearly doubled in size totaling 53,000 square feet and features a large ballroom for events.

The WMU team made their energy efficiency mark on Heritage Hall by implementing geothermal heating and cooling from 56 geothermal wells which provide 50% greater efficiency than traditional sources. They incorporated LED lighting, low energy windows, low-flush toilets and new insulation. The renovations transformed one of the least efficient buildings on campus into one of most efficient buildings.

The LEED project was accomplished with a collaborative effort from Western Michigan University, TowerPinkster, The Christman Company and others.

Western has a total of 16 LEED certified buildings with 6 underway, setting themselves on track to house 22 LEED buildings across campus.

Written by: Rebecca Holman, USGBC WM Communications Director



10 Common Site Development Strategies that will help earn LEED Certification

LEED Certification may not be as hard to achieve as you think! Many prerequisites and credits can be achieved simply based on your project location, or by following development rules already established in certain locations. Below are 10 common site development strategies you may already be doing that can help earn LEED Certification for your building.

  1. SESC Measures – many local SESC Permit requirements are equal to or more stringent than LEED requirements. These strategies will help achieve Sustainable Sites Prerequisite “Construction Activity Pollution Prevention”.
  2. Projects in dense or downtown areas may reduce their parking capacity.  This can lead towards Location and Transportation Credit “Reduced Parking Footprint” (1 point)
  3. Developing/Redeveloping in downtown/dense areas will allow you to achieve Location and Transportation Credit “Surrounding Density and Diverse Uses (up to 5 points)
  4. Many existing sites involve contamination and remediation efforts prior to development. These efforts will lead towards Location and Transportation Credit “High-Priority Site” (up to 2 points).
  5. Developing near public transportation such as bus stops, train stations or rideshare stops will help you achieve Location and Transportation Credit “Access to Quality Transit” (up to 5 points).
  6. Prefer concrete pavement to asphalt? Selecting hardscape materials with high reflectance characteristics will lead towards Sustainable Sites Credit “Heat Island Reduction” (up to 2 points).
  7. Does your project site consist of Sandy soils? High percolating soils will allow stormwater to be managed on site, leading to Sustainable Sites Credit “Rainwater Management” (up to 3 points).
  8. If you assess site conditions prior to design, your efforts will lead towards Sustainable Sites Credit “Site Assessment” (1 point)
  9. No irrigation for your site or landscape? This strategy will lead towards Water Efficiency Credit “Outdoor Water Use Reduction” (up to 2 points).
  10. Using cut-off light fixtures for site lighting – leads to Sustainable Sites Credit “Light Pollution Reduction” (1 point)
Guest blog by: Ryan Musch from FTC&H